Concerning the Muses and Sophia

diotimaThe irony of my posting on Jerome Rothenberg, Ezra Pound, Louis Dudek, and myself—all men—on International Women’s Day yesterday was hardly lost on me, but then the inspiration for what appears here has always been serendipitous. Today, then, it seems only all the more à propos my daily mail from Harriet should draw my attention to Carla Harryman’s engagement with German philosopher Ernst Bloch.

I’ve always been caught up in that dizzying, fateful relation between poetry and philosophy. I wrote my first poems at the same time I was devouring, if hardly digesting, Camus, Sartre, Kierkegaard, and Wittgenstein.

Because I sat on a bench in Victoria Park one spring Saturday morning reading Kiekegaard and Pound’s ABC of Reading and Selected Poems understanding nothing

Because lying out on the sunny lawn fifteen I read “Not how the world is is the mystical but that it is” and understood

Because John Newlove the Regina Public Library’s writer-in-residence gave me his Fatman and reading it in the shade on the white picnic table on the patio in our backyard thought “I can do that!” and wrote my first three poems

My undergraduate years were devoted to philosophy, and my graduate, to poetry; my MA creative thesis (In the Way of Knowledge) was an exploration of various ways thought inspired song and language incarnated thought, a field of writing I was to later find out has been central to a vital strain of German thought since the days of the Athenaeum (1798-1800).

Between then and now, my attention couldn’t help but be caught by what I came to call Canada’s Philosophische Quartett (a German television philosophical talk show hosted by Peter Sloterdijk first broadcast in 2002), a loose group of poets who took up the relation between thinking and singing as an explicit theme:  Robert Bringhurst, Tim Lilburn, Don McKay, (sometimes) Dennis Cooley, and Jan Zwicky, herself a professional philosopher, whose Wittgenstein Elegies (1986) I read as I prepared my MA thesis.

In recent years, all the overt poetic engagements with philosophy that have come to my attention have been by women. Mina Pam Dick (aka Hildebrand Pam Dick, Nico Pam Dick, et al.) holds, among other degrees, an MA in Philosophy; her first book, Delinquent (2009), engages Kierkegaard, Benjamin, and Wittgenstein through various personae and rhetorics, imitation, parody, and dialogue. Chantal Neveu’s A Spectacular Influence (trans. 2015) draws on the preSocratics, Nietzsche, and Spinoza to compose sparse meditations on incarnation, while Katy Bohinc‘s Dear Alain (2014) “demonstrates how Love, Math, Politics and Poetry are conditions on Philosophy, sexual metaphors intended, and poetry is everything.”

All these, and, doubtless, Harryman’s latest, and all those others I have been unaware of hitherto, surely call for more detailed consideration and appreciation than the mere passing mention I give here. Given world and enough and time, each shall receive due consideration, here!

 

 

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